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THE MUCH-DEFAMED LAMBRUSCO FROM THE EMILIA-ROMAGNA REGION OF ITALY IS BACK, AND THE BOTTLE BITCHES ARE GIVING IT A TRY – BUT SHOULD YOU BE DRINKING IT? READ ON TO FIND OUT THEIR VERDICT…

The Wine
Lambrusco Secco Reggiano NV – Emilia Romagna, Italy

Where it’s from
£9 from Marks & Spencer. It’s made from 75% Salamino, 15% Lambrusco Marani, and 10% Ancellotta, and the ABV is 11%.

The Lambrusco basics: Lambrusco is made from a family of very old grape varieties native to Italy, and most that you see on shelves will be a blend of these varietals. If you fancy getting to know this wine, the grape varietals that make what are regarded as the best styles are Lambrusco di Sorbara, Lambrusco Maestri, Lambrusco Grasparossa, and Lambrusco Salamino. This particular bottle is a blend of three, made by M&S winemaker Jeneve Williams, and historic producer Ermete Medici.

What is it?
Lambrusco is most commonly made by the Charmat method (the same way that Prosecco’s made), and although you can also find white Lambrusco, it’s usually the reds that we have on our shelves here in the UK. These red Lambrusco wines are often ripe, red-fruited and frothy, and best served chilled.

Eat it with…
These wines are made to be enjoyed in the warmer months, and are good on their own as an aperitif, but even better alongside traditional Italian foods like Prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano-Reggiano. They also stand up well against grilled barbecue foods, making them ideal sunshine sippers for the May Bank Holiday weekend!

Caro :This looks thick, feels thick, and grips to the tongue like the bitter sediments at the bottom of a bottle. Another sip and it tastes like that last-minute sangria you made out of whatever was in the fridge after you ran out of good booze. This is plain weird, but I’m giving it the benefit of the doubt, as it might make a whole lot more sense when paired with the right food.

Angela: For me, this one hits the mark for what you’d want from this wine – juicy, vibrant and fruity, with blueberries, redcurrants and fresh acidity. I’d probably only have a couple of glasses, and I’d definitely be after a Pastrami Madness cheese toasty on the side.

Kate: No, honey. I don’t like the way this Lambrusco smells (like the wine that my grandmother, who doesn’t drink wine, buys for Christmas, and I always steer clear of, no matter how much hanging out with my family makes me want or need a drink). I don’t enjoy the sensation of a bubbly either – too frothy! I don’t want to drink this in the sun, on a boat, at a barbecue, or ever, really. I hate this, sorry!

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